My Top Five Blogging Heroes

I firmly believe that blogging is one of the best ways to stay informed and up to date on the Library world. It is one of the best professional development tools we have, and I follow quite a few LIS blogs in my RSS feed. There are several bloggers who I enjoy so much that I consistently read every post they publish. I call them my blogging heroes because they inspire me to be a better blogger and a better librarian. Here they are in no particular order:

Char Booth

I wrote Char Booth’s section last. I almost don’t have words to express how much I admire her.  A book I read on instruction last year, referenced in this post (https://carriemoran.wordpress.com/2012/07/17/tutorial/) introduced me to her as an author, and I’ve been hooked on her Informational blog ever since. Before that I had seen a presentation recording of a talk she gave with Brian Mathews (see below!) and I was blown away by both of them. Char’s posts are usually long, and she’s incredibly intelligent. They are worth reading from start to finish every time. I can’t possibly pick a favorite recent post. I keep a list of blog ideas and her last 3 posts are on my list as possible discussion points. Her most recent post was a very practical overview of teaching group editing tools (Prezi, Google & Wikipedia), the post before was her outstanding analysis of learning styles, and the one before is her perspective on the ongoing library crisis narrative that seems all too prevalent in the news and blog world. She doesn’t post as frequently as the other bloggers on my list, but her blog is definitely a must read for me.

Barbara Fister

Barbara Fister’s posts for Inside Higher Ed focus on many of the challenges and broader issues faced by academic libraries/librarians. I find her posts easy to read even when they are about challenging topics, and she is obviously very in touch with the LIS world. She often mentions other sources for information that are just as valuable as her posts. She’s also not afraid to make bold statements on current issues. Although I may not always agree with her, she always gives me a new perspective and understanding of the issues.

Brian Mathews 

I love Brian Mathews’ Ubiquitous Librarian entries because they are usually short and make me think. His view of libraries is large scale and visionary, and I love reading about what he’s doing and what trends he thinks are important. We got his book “Marketing Today’s Academic Library: A Bold New Approach to Communicating with Students” in about a month ago but I haven’t had a chance to dig in yet. That will be my next work related book when I finally finish Resonate!

Ellyssa Kroski 
Ellyssa Kroski’s iLibrarian blog is one of my favorites because she always has very practical information that’s often broken into lists. She posts frequently (but not overwhelmingly so), and is always posting about relevant LIS topics. One of my favorite recent posts by her was “10 Tips for Conference Presentations That Rock”. I definitely did my best to follow them last week!

Lauren Pressley

Lauren Pressley’s blog is my go to for information on instruction. She did a great series on Teaching Strategies for Librarians that posted while I was in my own big push to get a better foundation in pedagogy and teaching. Her posts can be long but they are always a good mix of theoretical, factual, and anecdotal content.  She will often post materials she uses in classes and is very open about what works and what doesn’t.

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2 thoughts on “My Top Five Blogging Heroes

  1. Pingback: ALA Chicago 2013 Recap | Digital Carrie

  2. Pingback: This is How I Work | Digital Carrie

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